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Herb Reference Guide

Cinnamon

History

Cinnamon bark is the dried inner bark from the shoots of the tree from the Lauraceae family. Ceylon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum), Indonesian (Cinnamomum burmanii), and Chinese cassia (Cinnamomum cassia) are the most commonly found species of commerce. In addition to its thousands of culinary uses across a number of various cultures, it has been used for thousands of years as a carminative, astringent, local stimulant, antiseptic, hemostatic, and is widely used in traditional herbal medicine to support healthy digestion.

Function

The bark of the preferred species (zeylanicum and burmanii) contain up to 10% volatile oil content in which the constituent Cinnamaldehyde is found. Cinnamaldehyde has antioxidant properties and helps support fat and cholesterol levels in a normal range. The phenolic compounds, especially the polyphenolic polymers, have been studied for their effects to support insulin and blood sugar levels within a normal range and promote healthy blood flow. Maintaining healthy blood sugar levels is vital to promoting healthy vision, heart, circulation, kidneys and a healthy nervous system.

Uses of Cinnamon

Disclaimer

This information in our Herbal Reference Guide is intended only as a general reference for further exploration, and is not a replacement for professional health advice. This content does not provide dosage information, format recommendations, toxicity levels, or possible interactions with prescription drugs. Accordingly, this information should be used only under the direct supervision of a qualified health practitioner such as a naturopathic physician.

Active Constituents

Contains cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, mucilage, tannins, carotenoids, and phenolics.

Parts Used

  • Bark

Important precautions

Additional Resources