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Herb Reference Guide

Chamomile

History

Everybody remembers the childhood story of Peter Rabbit. After his harrowing experience in the farmer's garden, Peter is comforted by his mother making him a warm cup of Chamomile tea. The significance of the genus name Matricaria, which is derived from the latin Matrix, meaning Mother or Womb, indicates its use since antiquity for problems of the female reproductive system as well as the calming and soothing affect only a mother can have. Herbalists have used this plant to support digestion, promote the easing of colic and other complaints resulting from nervous excitability or tension and other situations where a gentle relaxant is called for.

Function

Chamomile can act gently on many systems in the body due to its ability to modulate a healthy inflammatory response in the body and provide a sense of calm for the nervous system. It can be used for occasional irritation in the digestive system to calm and sooth. It is also beneficial for those with restlessness, irritability and sensitivity.

Uses of Chamomile

Disclaimer

This information in our Herbal Reference Guide is intended only as a general reference for further exploration, and is not a replacement for professional health advice. This content does not provide dosage information, format recommendations, toxicity levels, or possible interactions with prescription drugs. Accordingly, this information should be used only under the direct supervision of a qualified health practitioner such as a naturopathic physician.

Active Constituents

Chamomile has many volatile oils among them; proazulenes, bisabolol, farnesine, pinene, anthemal, spiroether, and angelic acid. It also contains alpha bisabolol, matricin, apigenin, sesquiterpine lactones, flavonoids (apigenin, quercitin, patuletin, and luteolin), cyanogenic glycosides, bitter glycosides, coumarins, valerianic acids and tannins.

Parts Used

  • Fresh flowers

Important precautions

Additional Resources

Mckay DL, Blumberg, JB. Phtyotherapy Research. 2006 Jul; 20(7): 519-30

Ramadan M, Goeters S, et Al. Journal of Natural Products. 2006 Jul; 69(7): 1041-5