Caraway

History

This plant is a member of the Apiaceae family and looks like its cousin the carrot. It’s native to Western Asia, Europe and North Africa and prefers a warm sunny climate Caraway produces a tiny fruit erroneously referred to as a seed. The literature cites several possibilities for the derivation of the name Caraway, many referring it to a blending of the Latin (cuminum for cumin) and Greek (karon, also for cumin) into the current Latin genus, Carum. If you’ve eaten Rye Bread you’ve tasted Caraway fruits.

Function

It contains large amounts of essential oils and has been traditionally used to flavor various liqueurs and digestive aperitifs. The fruits were also used in Sauerkraut to help dispel gas and flavor the sour tasting delicacy. Many digestive teas in Europe use Caraway seeds to help ease occasional digestive discomfort and tension from bloating.

Uses of Caraway

Disclaimer

This information in our Herbal Reference Guide is intended only as a general reference for further exploration, and is not a replacement for professional health advice. This content does not provide dosage information, format recommendations, toxicity levels, or possible interactions with prescription drugs. Accordingly, this information should be used only under the direct supervision of a qualified health practitioner such as a naturopathic physician.

Active Constituents

Carvone, Limonene, and various other essential oils

Parts Used

  • Fruits

Important precautions

Not for use during pregnancy or lactation.

Additional Resources

Herb Reference Guide

 
*This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
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