Burdock

History

This plant is very widely distributed and can be found growing in field borders, roadsides, and empty spaces across China, Europe, Britain, North America and several other landmasses. Most people are familiar with the flowers of Burdock which form globe shaped clusters around the top of the stem covered with a dense alignment of stiff “hooks” that will cling to anything they touch. The root is very delicious and is served in Chinese, Korean, and other Asian dishes prepared by peeling and cooking the whole root. The leaves of some species can reach 3 feet in diameter and produce very large roots. Burdock is a member of the Sunflower or Compositae family and is sometimes called beggar’s buttons, or thorny burr.

Function

Burdock is a versatile plant frequently classified by herbalists as an alterative, a plant, which among other things influences the blood and lymph. It has bitter principles, which encourage healthy digestion and appetite. Burdock also supports Healthy and Vital Skin with a clear complexion. One of the ways it functions to do so is by promoting normal liver function and by supporting the detoxification process in the body.

Uses of Burdock

Disclaimer

This information in our Herbal Reference Guide is intended only as a general reference for further exploration, and is not a replacement for professional health advice. This content does not provide dosage information, format recommendations, toxicity levels, or possible interactions with prescription drugs. Accordingly, this information should be used only under the direct supervision of a qualified health practitioner such as a naturopathic physician.

Active Constituents

flavonoids; gobosterin, essential oil, fatty oil, bitter glycosides, alkaloids, tannins, polyacetylenes, inulin, resin and mucilage.

Parts Used

  • Root, Seed

Important precautions

Not to be used during pregnancy or lactation. If you have a medical condition or take pharmaceutical drugs, please consult with your doctor before using this product.

Additional Resources

Herb Reference Guide

 
*This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
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