Turnera diffusa

Damiana

Turnera diffusa

Damiana

This shrub native to Southwest Texas in the U.S. and Central America, South America, and Mexico has a long history of use as an aphrodisiac. The leaves have traditionally been made into a tea and incense, which was used by native people of Central and South America for its relaxing effects. Spanish missionaries first recorded that the Mexican Indians drank Damiana tea mixed with sugar for use as an aphrodisiac. It is also an ingredient in a traditional Mexican Liqueur, which is sometimes used as a substitute for Triple Sec in Margaritas.

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Traditional Health Benefits of Damiana

Men, Immune Support, Women, Stress Support

What is Damiana Used for?

It acts as a tonic on the central nervous system and hormonal system. The lack of scientific evidence for the plants use to enhance sexual performance is eclipsed by its use in the traditional cultures where it has a very strong reputation of efficacy in this arena for men and women. It has also been used traditionally to help support a healthy mood and healthy urinary tract function*.

View Important Precautions

Active Constituents of Damiana

Flavonoids, maltol glucoside, phenolics, cyanogenic glycosides, monoterpenoids, sesquiterpenoids, triterpenoids, the polyterpene ficaprenol-11, fatty acids

Parts Used

Leaf

Additional Resources

1.) Szewczyk K, Zidorn C. Ethnobotany, phytochemistry, and bioactivity of the genus Turnera (Passifloraceae) with a focus on damiana--Turnera diffusa. J Ethnopharmacol 2014;152(3):424-43. 2.) Piacente, S., Camargo, E. E., Zampelli, A., Gracioso, J. S., Souza Brito, A. R., Pizza, C., and Vilegas, W. Flavonoids and arbutin from Turnera diffusa. Z Naturforsch.[C.] 2002;57(11-12):983-985 3.) Zhao J, Pawar RS, Ali Z, Khan IA. Phytochemical investigation of Turnera diffusa. J Nat Prod 2007;70:289-92. 4.) Estrada-Reyesb, K.R., Ortiz-Lópeza, P., Gutiérrez-Ortíza, J., & Martínez Mota, L. (June 2009), "Turnera diffusa Wild (Turneraceae) recovers sexual behavior in sexually exhausted males", Journal of Ethnopharmacology 123: 423-429 5.) Zhao, J., Dasmahapatra, A.K., Khan, S.I., & Khan, I.A. (December 2008), "Anti-aromatase activity of the constituents from damiana (Turnera diffusa)", Journal of Ethnopharmacology 120: 387–393

Important Precautions

Not for use during pregnancy or lactation. If you have a medical condition or take pharmaceutical drugs please consult your doctor prior to use.

Disclaimer

This information in our Herbal Reference Guide is intended only as a general reference for further exploration, and is not a replacement for professional health advice. This content does not provide dosage information, format recommendations, toxicity levels, or possible interactions with prescription drugs. Accordingly, this information should be used only under the direct supervision of a qualified health practitioner such as a naturopathic physician.

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