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Can You Take Ginger and Ginseng Together?

Published on November 29, 2023


By Kristen Boye BS, Natural Health

Kristen Boye

Kristen Boye is a natural health expert, writer, copywriter, and editor. Kristen was raised on an organic farm in British Columbia which inspired her life’s work. She holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Natural Health, is a Certified Natural Foods Chef, co-owner of a medicinal herb farm, and is a natural foods and children’s health advocate. Kristen lives with her husband and two children on their medicinal herb farm in Western North Carolina.

https://www.holisticwritingconcepts.com
Can You Take Ginger and Ginseng Together?
Can You Take Ginger and Ginseng Together?

Wondering if you can take Ginger and Ginseng together?

In this article, we’ll explain why it is likely fine and even beneficial, plus a brief history and the differences and similarities between Ginger and Ginseng.

What is the Difference Between Ginger and Ginseng?

Although their names sound similar, Ginger and Ginseng are two entirely different plant species.

Ginger, also known as Zingiber officinale Roscoe, Ginger Root, or Ginger Rhizome is in the same family as Cardamom and Turmeric.REF#3198

It is also one of the most commonly consumed condiments in the world, primarily in Indian and Asian cuisine.

This spice dates back over 3000 years to the Sanskrit word srngaveram, meaning “horn root,” which is descriptive of its appearance. 

Modern research has revealed various plant compounds in Ginger believed to be responsible for its potential health benefits. Gingerols and shogaols are believed to be its most powerful plant compounds.

Ginseng was the most revered herbs in ancient China, Korea, Japan, and America.REF#3199 

Ginseng was discovered over 5,000 years ago in the mountains of Manchuria, China and references to it have been found in books dating back over two millennia.

Also known as “the king of the herbs” it was considered so potent (and costly) that it was reserved for Chinese Emperors.

Ginseng’s Latin name is derived from the Greek word panacea, meaning “for everything,” which is how Ginseng is perceived in Traditional Chinese Medicine and other traditional herbalism practices, including Native American folklore.

The most commonly used Ginseng species are: 

  • Korean ginseng (P. ginseng), which is native to the Korean Peninsula and northern China,
  • And American ginseng (P. quinquefolius), which is native to the United States and Canada. 

Note: “Siberian Ginseng,” which is not in the Ginseng family as previously believed, is now known as Eleuthero.

Research has shown Ginseng contains various active plant compounds, such as antioxidants, over 50 types of ginsenosides, and other nutrients believed to carry out its beneficial mechanisms. 

The Traditional Uses of Ginger and Ginseng

Ginger and Ginseng are both used extensively in Traditional Chinese Medicine and other traditional herbal practices.

For example:

Ginger has been Traditionally Used to:

  • Support digestion*
  • Relieve mild or occasional nausea or morning sickness*

    Ginseng has been Traditionally Used to:

    • Maintain energy*
    • Promote stamina*
    • As an adaptogen (a type of herb that helps the body adapt to various physical, mental, and emotional stressors)*
    • Support an active lifestyle*

      What Ginger and Ginseng Have in Common

      Despite their differences, Ginger and Ginseng do have some things in common. For example: 

      • They are both roots
      • They are both used extensively in Traditional Chinese Medicine and other traditional herbal practices
      • They are both grown and cultivated in Asia
      • Both may support normal inflammatory response*
      • Both have been extensively studied for their potential health and wellness benefits*

      Now that you have an understanding of the differences and similarities between the two, let's look at why Ginger and Ginseng can be taken together.

      Can You Take Ginger and Ginseng Together?

      There is no evidence suggesting Ginger and Ginseng cannot be taken together.

      On the contrary, Traditional Chinese Medicine and other systems of wellness often combine Ginger with Ginseng in herbal formulas for various purposes.

      Ginger and Ginseng Tea is also a popular winter elixir supporting immunity, energy, and overall wellness in traditional herbalism.*

      However, not everyone will benefit from Ginger and Ginseng, either together or individually.

      For example, Ginger may be contraindicated for people taking blood thinners or those with blood disorders due to its possible effects on blood viscosity.REF#3200

      Ginseng may be inappropriate for those who are pregnant, nursing, or those taking certain medications such as calcium channel blockers, antidepressants, Warfarin, diabetes medication, and other high blood pressure medications.REF#3201

      Interested in Adding Ginger and/or Ginseng to your Wellness Routine?

      Gaia Herbs offers various Ginger and Ginseng supplements crafted using the highest quality ingredients.

      For example:

      • Ginger Supreme for digestive support contains a comforting blend of Ginger and Turmeric and is a great aid for those times when you occasionally overindulge.*
      • Ginseng Supreme for energy stamina support contains a blend of American Ginseng and Eleuthero. A great choice to help sustain your active life.

      REFERENCES:

      • 1. , "The Amazing and Mighty Ginger", In: Benzie IFF, Wachtel-Galor S, editors. Herbal Medicine: Biomolecular and Clinical Aspects. 2nd edition. Boca Raton (FL): CRC Press/Taylor & Francis; 2011. Chapter 7. 1 1. , "The Amazing and Mighty Ginger", In: Benzie IFF, Wachtel-Galor S, editors. Herbal Medicine: Biomolecular and Clinical Aspects. 2nd edition. Boca Raton (FL): CRC Press/Taylor & Francis; 2011. Chapter 7.
      • 2. , "Ancient herbal therapy: A brief history of Panax ginseng", Journal of Ginseng Research. . 2 2. , "Ancient herbal therapy: A brief history of Panax ginseng", Journal of Ginseng Research. .
      • 3. , "The Effect of Ginger (Zingiber officinale) on Platelet Aggregation: A Systematic Literature Review", PLoS One. 2015. 3 3. , "The Effect of Ginger (Zingiber officinale) on Platelet Aggregation: A Systematic Literature Review", PLoS One. 2015.
      • 4. , "Asian Ginseng", NIH National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health.. 4 4. , "Asian Ginseng", NIH National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health..